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Beauty and Fashion

I never dreamed I’d post videos in a bikini shaking my wobbly bits… but it helps people, says Chessie King – The Sun

WALKING down the street three years ago, Chessie King was a ball of anxiety.

She feared one of her thousands of followers on social media might recognise her — and brand her a fraud for looking so different to her posed and filtered images on Instagram.

Shocked by her own feelings, Chessie, 26, realised those impractical standards were no basis for living in the real world.

So she began to post honest, unfiltered pictures to promote confidence over perfection.

The positive response was overwhelming and Chessie has since amassed a much larger social media following, with almost 800,000 fans, including TV host and fitness guru Davina McCall, who appeared in one of her videos last year.

She is a champion for body confidence and the author of new book Be Your Own Best Friend: The Glorious Truths Of Being Female.

The South Londoner says: “I love the quote, ‘What other people think about me is none of my business’.

“It’s everything I’m about and I want to spread this message as much as I can.”

But the road to confidence hasn’t been smooth. As a teen Chessie was taller than her friends and very aware of how she looked.

She says: “I started to realise I was taller and bigger than my friends when I was 16.

'I feel liberated’

“I was walking side by side with a friend, who looked at our reflection in a window and said, ‘Oh, my God, I can’t be seen out with you — it looks like I’m out with Mum’. I realised I wasn’t going to just ‘fit in’.

“Mum told me to embrace being tall. But I was different — the last thing I wanted to be.”

Chessie looked into modelling, hoping to make the most of her height.

She says: “I was told I needed to lose weight by a modelling agency, which sparked an unhealthy period where I didn’t eat enough.

“I was never ill but I knew I wasn’t eating right. When I was 20, someone suggested I do a bikini competition.

“I wasn’t sure at first but I took on the 18-week challenge of eating next to nothing and working out twice a day. I walked on stage with nine per cent body fat and was still told I was too big.”

Rather than push Chessie deeper into unhealthy patterns, it sparked her passion for promoting self-confidence.

She started eating properly and posting fitness videos on Instagram, building a following along the way.

She says: “I’d pose up perfectly to flatter my figure. Then I realised I was getting real social anxiety that I’d bump into a follower and they would think I don’t look as good as I do in the pictures I put online.

“I started posting the best images of me — ones that would make the cut for Instagram — but also posting ones that didn’t ‘make the cut’ alongside it. I couldn’t believe how many girls said I was ‘brave’ for doing it.

“That made me realise there was a real need to show this.”

That need is greater than ever. Experts report falling self-esteem among internet users in lockdown.

Research suggests women feel bad about themselves four times a day, while 61 per cent of us would not describe ourselves as confident.

Chessie, who lives with her boyfriend Matthew Carter, 31, a TV presenter and student, says: “I had a moment a few years ago where I was saying something negative about how I look and Matt turned to me and said, ‘Excuse me — don’t talk to yourself like that’.

“I realised he was right. We all have so much time in our own heads now in lockdown — it’s so important that voice is kind and loving.

“I’m at the stage where I can post anything about my body and not be embarrassed.

“I feel really liberated by that. Three years ago, if you told me I’d be posting videos to thousands of people of myself in a bikini shaking my wobbly bits around, I’d never have believed it.

“But when I realised it was helping people, I knew I’d keep doing it.”

Chessie has learned you can not take body-confidence for granted, as she found when shopping for a wedding dress.

While her July wedding has been postponed due to the pandemic, she says: “I re-learn body confidence all the time.

“When I was shopping for a wedding dress, I struggled to fit in some that were five times too small for me.

“I asked one of the shop owners, ‘What is the most common thing brides say when they try on dresses?’.

"And she said, ‘They always apologise — they say sorry and promise to lose weight for the wedding’.

“We are taught we have to look our absolute best on our wedding day. I thought, ‘Matt proposed to me the size I am — he’s not expecting me to change for our big day’.

“No one is going to remember me for how small I looked.

“They’ll remember the time we laughed until we cried.

“I just want women — and men — to know they are awesome.”

'Dancing naked makes you feel brave'

IN her book Be Your Own Best Friend: The Glorious Truths Of Being Female, Chessie helps women find their inner confidence.

Here are some extracts:

Be your own best friend

ONE of my friends was struggling with her image and I asked her to send me a message about her home and why it feels like her happy, safe place.

She said she loved her bed where she sleeps, her table where she eats and her walls where she hangs her memories. She didn’t once say: “I hate.”

I replied: “So why are you saying you despise your arms, your legs, your tummy? They are your body – your home for the rest of your life.”

Something that has massively helped me is speaking about my body the way I speak about my best friends’ bodies. Would I tell anyone their thighs are too chunky and they look gross when they sit down? No.

So why would you say it to yourself? I cannot say it enough – I literally want to record it as your ringtone, set it as your alarm: Be your own best friend.

Love the skin you're in

I DODGED acne until I was 17 so when it came, I was shocked. It honestly felt like I went to sleep one night then woke up with the world’s most complicated dot-to-dot.

I tried everything, from eating three raw garlic cloves every morning for a week to a strong course of Roaccutane, which ate up all the happy cells in my brain.

I tried LED light therapy sessions, I cut out dairy, sugar and fat, I used all the topical creams available. I used to have evenings before bed when I’d spend up to an hour attacking my face until it was bleeding and scarred.

If you have struggled or are currently struggling with adult acne, I feel you. I hear you. It is not for ever.

It takes patience. We are finally best friends, my skin and I. We fall out still but I treat it with so much more respect now – nothing extreme, just a consistent daily routine. Try:

  1. Use speakerphone or headphones instead of pushing your dirty phone screen against your face.
  2. Those magnifying mirrors that make you see every teeny, tiny little thing on your face . . . stay away from them. They are bullies.
  3. Wash your face straight after sweating or, if you can’t, use Clinisept, which is antibacterial.
  4. Try not to play with your face.
  5. Take off your cleanser with a natural cloth, such as a cotton muslin (you can get three for £10 online).

Confidence has no age limit

It took me until the age of 23 to finally find my body confidence.

To some people, who have suffered with low body confidence their whole lives, this will seem really young.

To others who have been confident since puberty, this will seem ancient. The thing I tell everyone is that finding your body confidence does not have a deadline.

I am constantly learning even now and I have new mums, women in their sixties and girls at school messaging me.

Remember, whatever your stage of life, it is never too late to find confidence, appreciate it and nurture it.

Body confidence is still a pretty new conversation. Maybe you find a stronger connection to body acceptance or body celebration. Whatever rings true to you.

Dance like no one is watching

Being brave is the red lipstick of emotions. As children, we have bravery coming out of our ears.

We try everything because we don’t care what people think about the result or how our bodies look when we are doing it. That gives us a wild energy we lack as adults. We stop doing carefree things and lose our bravery.

I prescribe dancing. I’m a pro at dancing in the house naked until I’m sweating.

If you dance like no one is watching, you find pure joy. Finding my inner child relights that fire inside.

Make a promise you will try a childlike activity in the next month.

Give yourself the time your younger self would thank you for. Savour that superpower it gives you.

  • Be Your Own Best Friend: The glorious truths of being female, By Chessie King, out now, £14.99, Harper Collins

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Celebrities

5 Bizarre Video Games Featuring Professional Athletes

At this point, professional sports and video games are intertwined. Baseball, basketball, football, soccer, and almost every other major sports have video games in which players at home can be their favorite athletes.

Sometimes, however, these video games are a far cry from the sport they play for money. Throughout history, there have been several bizarre attempts to use athletes to sell different types of games. 

‘Shaq Fu’ combined Shaquille O’Neal and martial arts

One of the most infamous failures in gaming history, Shaquille O’Neal never shied away from exploring the limits of his superstardom. With platinum rap albums and several films under his belt, O’Neal decided to use his NBA star power to release a game, but it wasn’t a basketball game. The results would go down in infamy.

Shaq Fu was a fighting game that saw O’Neal on a quest through a fantastic world to rescue a young boy named Nezu. It was a critical failure.

However, the game developed a cult following thanks to its bizarre nature, and in 2018 a new edition of the game called Shaq Fu: A Legend Reborn was released. While still poorly reviewed, it was not as infamous as its predecessor.

‘Michael Jordan: Chaos in the Windy City’ had Jordan rescue his teammates 

RELATED: ‘Space Jam’ Wasn’t the Only Move Michael Jordan Appeared In

Michael Jordan refused to sign on to the Players’ Association at the height of his NBA career. This meant that the Chicago Bulls superstar was withheld from several classic basketball franchises. Those who wanted to be the greatest basketball player of all time could scratch that itch thanks to Michael Jordan: Chaos in the Windy City

The game was less NBA Jam and more Super Mario Bros, as players guided Jordan through a journey to rescue his captured teammates and fight a variety of creatures along the way.

Jordan used his basketballs as weapons, and like Shaq Fu, the game now has a special spot in the heart of many ’90s kids who bought it at the height of his celebrity.

‘Bill Laimbeer’s Combat Basketball’ combined basketball and fisticuffs

Unlike Shaq Fu and Chaos in the Windy City, Bill Laimbeer’s video game was a basketball game — sort of. Bill Laimbeer’s Combat Basketball combined basketball and combat, both of which were staples of his career. It was a remarkably violent event in the history of gaming, but memorable because of it. 

The game’s aesthetic looked more like something out of a Mad Max movie than an NBA arena, and while it wasn’t well-received, it is a nostalgic hit with fans everywhere. 

‘Blitz: The League’ featured NFL players, drugs, and strippers

RELATED: Former NFL Player Antonio Cromartie Must Pay $336,000 per Year to Support 8 of His 14 Kids

Blitz: The League is, by all means, a sports video game. A simple look at the cover might even trick the casual fan into thinking that they were buying a run-of-the-mill football game.

What made this game different was the story around its football play. After losing the NFL licensing due to Madden’s exclusivity, Midway wanted to continue the hard-hitting style of the predecessor.

Free from any censorship that might come with a family league, Blitz: The League made a darker video game in which bones were shown snapping thanks to X-Ray vision, steroids as a means to mend a variety of gruesome and more profanity than the average movie. To make it more official, the game employed retired NFL players like Bill Romanowski and Lawrence Taylor to voice doppelgängers for the gritty game. 

The game was a big enough success to warrant a sequel, but the Blitz brand went back to a family-friendly NFL product before disappearing forever. 

‘SpongeBob at Bat’

On the opposite end of the spectrum from Blitz: The League, Nicktoons MLB looked to get a younger audience hooked on baseball. They did so by mashing up the worlds of SpongeBob SquarePants, Ren and Stimpy, Avatar: The Last Airbender with Major League Baseball. The result was a bizarre mix of cartoon antics and real-life baseball. 

While the makers of the game may have hoped they had a hit on their hands, the game was never a big enough success to warrant any franchises. What remains, however, is a strange look at what happens when two different worlds collide. 

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Lifestyle

‘Rain on Me’ video: Lady Gaga, Ariana Grande get wet and wild

Pop divas Lady Gaga and Ariana Grande get wet and wild in the music video for their collaborative single “Rain on Me.”

The three-minute video, released Friday afternoon, features the dynamic duo surrounded by backup dancers as they frolic — in custom-made bodysuits — on a waterlogged soundstage, both together and apart. It’s the latest single to drop from Gaga’s highly anticipated upcoming “Chromatica” album, which will be released next Friday, May 29.

Variety reported Thursday that Grande, 26, called the music video “so Gaga and so fun” in an Apple Music interview with Zane Lowe that was set to be released later Friday. “I was like, ‘I’ve never dressed like this in my life. I’m just having the best time,’” said Grande, who added that it “feels so fun to be part of something so upbeat and straight pop again.”

She also saluted Gaga, 34, for reclaiming her “BDE, the Big Diva Energy thing” and “healing herself” through her new music and their collaboration.

Gaga, meanwhile, said she encouraged Grande to let loose for the video shoot.

“I remember I said to her, ‘Okay, now everything that you care about while you sing, I want you to forget it and just sing. And by the way, while you’re doing that, I’m going to dance in front of you,’” she said. “Because we had this huge big window. I was like, ‘I’m going to dance in front of you.’ And she was like, ‘Oh my God. Oh my God, I can’t, I can’t. I don’t know. Oh my God. Okay, okay.’ And then I did it and she sang, and she started to do things with her voice that (were) different. And it was the joy of two artists going, ‘I see you.’”

Gaga explained that the song — including the lyrics “I’d rather be dry, but at least I’m alive / Rain on me” — is a metaphor about drinking to “numb” herself, and said she considered sobriety while creating the album.

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World News

Video captures wild paint fight at Florida Home Depot

What a bunch of tools!

Crazy video captured four men outside a Home Depot in Tampa, Florida, on Wednesday, nailing each other with blows and throwing open paint cans at each other in complete disregard of social-distancing measures.

A large man in a blue T-shirt and paint-covered jeans is seen flinging a can at another man near a red pickup truck, as an accomplice in a white shirt swings a garden hoe.

The big man then lumbers toward a much smaller man who retreats while holding another open can of white paint, which he then throws at his attacker, who then proceeds to attack a man in a striped shirt.

“The men all knew each other and worked together. They declined to press charges,” a spokeswoman for the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office told The Post.

She said it was not known what sparked the free-for-all.

The violent incident is the second fight to have occurred at a Home Depot in under a week.

On Saturday, police responded to a fight at a store in Jonesboro, Arkansas, where Charles Tyrone Brown, 69, allegedly attacked a 71-year-old man who had “violated social-distancing recommendations,” according to KAIT8.com.

Brown told police he asked the victim to step back to follow social-distancing guidelines, but the man told him “that wasn’t going to happen.”

Brown said he felt threatened when the victim placed his hand on a holstered handgun, so he hit him with a boxed Dremel tool, causing the man to fall to the ground and suffer a cut above his eye.

Neither man was arrested in the incident.

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World News

Fascinating colourised video shows residents of Beijing in the 1920s

The life of China a century ago: Fascinating colourised video shows residents of Beijing bowing to each other, attending a funeral procession and trading at a bustling street market in the 1920s

  • Intriguing historical footage from the 1920s was restored by a Chinese artist
  • The century-old video captured the lively street scenes in China’s capital city
  • Residents are seen attending a funeral procession and trading at a street market
  • Hu, the Beijing-born artist, described colourising the footage as ‘time-travelling’

An intriguing historical video colourised by a Chinese artist has vividly shown what life was like for the residents of Beijing in the 1920s.

The fascinating footage, which captured the lively street scenes in the capital city, was brought back to life with artificial intelligence technology.

Beijing residents dressed in traditional attire are seen greeting each other with bows, attending a funeral procession and trading at a bustling street market.

Beijing residents are seen praying at a temple as some of them holding burning incenses in the colourised footage produced by Wengu Eddy Hu

People are pictured walking around a street market in Beijing as some of them curiously stare at the camera in the colourised footage produced by Wengu Eddy Hu

The picture shows hordes of people attending what appears to be a funeral procession as they walk on the street in Beijing in the colourised footage produced by Wengu Eddy Hu

The century-old clips, originally shot by an unnamed Canadian photographer, were restored in colour by Wengu Eddy Hu, a Beijing-born video game developer who now lives in New York.

Hu, 28, said that he was deeply touched by the archive footage of his hometown after stumbling across it on YouTube.

He told MailOnline: ‘I was especially moved by a lot of the shots in which people were staring at the camera. People from a hundred years ago are looking at me through a screen.

‘It felt like [we were] communicating through time.’


An astonishing colourised video produced by a Chinese artist, Wengu Eddy Hu, has vividly shown what life was like for the residents of Beijing in the 1920s

The picture shows a landscape of the streets in Beijing during the 1920s in the colourised footage produced by Wengu Eddy Hu

People are seen gathering on the street in Beijing in the colourised footage produced by Wengu Eddy Hu

The New York-based artist, who had been teaching himself about artificial intelligence for the past year, was eager to apply the technology to transform the grainy old film 

The New York-based artist, who had been teaching himself about artificial intelligence for the past year, was eager to apply the technology to transform the grainy old film.

‘I first wanted to understand AI technology because I wanted to learn it to help me develop video games or compose music,’ he said. ‘But I later realised that it could be used in a lot of different areas.’

Hu adopted three types of neural network-powered AI algorithms to ‘upscale’ the footage so that every frame appears clearer, sharper and coloured.

He said that he was inspired by the work of Denis Shiryaev, a YouTuber who is an expert in restoring black and white footage with AI technology.

The ten-minute-long video took Hu about seven days to complete. He also added sound effects and traditional music – such as Beijing Opera – to bring the muted footage to life.

When talking about the process of restoring the video, the Chinese artist said that it felt like ‘travelling back to the past’.

‘It felt like I was living amongst those people. You can see from the video that a lot of things have changed over time, but there are also a lot of things that have remained the same.’

Hu was surprised to find that his colourised video amassed over 20million views after being uploaded on Weibo, the Chinese equivalent of Twitter, on Friday.

‘This is my first time restoring footage like this and it became viral. I was overwhelmed,’ he said.

People’s Daily, the Chinese state media which initially uploaded the archive footage to YouTube, also reposted the artist’s work.

When talking about the process of restoring the video, the Chinese artist said that it felt like ‘travelling back to the past’. People are seen walking on a street in Beijing during the 1920s

Hu is planning to restore more historical footage filmed in other Chinese major cities – such as Shanghai and Guangzhou – after receiving much praise online for his work

Hu told MailOnline: ‘I thought maybe some of my friends from Beijing would find it interesting because they are from there.

‘But I didn’t think that so many Chinese people, even ones who live outside the country, would resonate with the video. It really moved me,’ he added.

Hu is planning to restore more historical footage filmed in other Chinese major cities – such as Shanghai and Guangzhou – after receiving much praise online for his work.

‘I’m happy [with the video] overall, but there are still some inaccuracies in colourising with artificial intelligence,’ he said.

‘The restored footage was not 100 per cent precise because we are still not too sure about the colour of the clothes people were wearing at that time. 

‘This is something we can improve. Because the AI references to its database, which has stored mainly Western sources at the moment, to colourise footage,’ Hu explained.

He said that programmers like himself could ‘train the technology’ to trace colours more accurately by making it familiarise with Chinese history and culture. 

Wengu Eddy Hu (pictured) has been working as an independent game developer after finishing his master’s at the School of Visual Arts in New York City four years ago 


Hu has his own channel on Bilibili, a Chinese video platform, where Hu regularly uploads tutorials on a range of topics, from creating animation to explaining AI algorithms

Hu has been working as an independent game developer after finishing his master’s at the School of Visual Arts in New York City in 2016.

One of the games Hu designed on his own, Eddy Violet, has been downloaded more than 100,000 times by Chinese users.

He also has his channel on Bilibili, a Chinese video platform, where Hu regularly uploads tutorials on a range of topics, from creating animation to explaining AI algorithms.

‘I think I will go back home at some point in the future,’ Hu said. ‘There is a lot of potential in the arts and culture industry in China.’

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Celebrities

Kristen Bell records video of Dax Shepard performing surgery on his own hand

Self-isolating has people turning to their own devices for everything — even surgery.

After recently injuring his arm, Dax Shepard chose to remove pins from his hand while his wife, Kristen Bell, recorded the ordeal.

Bell shared the video of her 45-year-old husband to Instagram.

In the clip, Shepard apparently was on the phone with his doctor as he reached into his cast and removed a clean pin.

“Alright, I’m going to commence the procedure,” Shepard said in the video. “Oh, yep, that feels weird.”

Shepard then removed the full pin from his hand as he cheered and Bell, 39, gasped.

“It’s out,” he told the doctor. “It’s out, there’s no blood spurting anywhere. I’m coming for your job, doctor. I’m going to add pin removal to my resume now.”

As Shepard said, there was no blood from removing the pin, which came out quickly, easily and cleanly.

“Am I the worst patient you’ve ever had?” the actor joked. “I’m texting you nonstop, now I’m pulling pins out you put in.”

Bell shared the video on Friday, writing, “We’re on day ‘I can do my own surgery’ of quarantine,” in the caption.

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World News

Mother shares video of son to show what coronavirus cough sounds like

‘Mama, I’m not gonna go home’: Doctor shares shocking video of her four-year-old son struggling to breathe after contracting coronavirus as she warns parents to take the virus seriously

  • Anna Zimmerman posted a clip of little boy Lincoln who had difficulty breathing earlier this month on his fifth day in a Colorado medical facility 
  • He was on as much as 9 liters of oxygen a day at one point and he would tell her: ‘Mama, this isn’t worth it. Mama, I’m not gonna go home’ 
  • He has since recovered but she warned watching a child suffer is heartbreaking
  • Zimmerman wrote: ‘The medical terms used to describe respiratory distress – seesaw breathing, nasal flaring, grunting, retracting, tachypneic – he had them’
  • ‘He will cough up slime, and look totally air hungry. His saturations will drop and his heart rate will spike,’ Zimmerman shared in her blog  
  • She signed off: ‘Please stay safe. Please take this virus seriously – it is no joke’ 
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

A physician has shared a video of what a coronavirus cough can sound like in a child after her four-year-old son was hospitalized last month despite the family going into quarantine before Colorado ordered lockdowns.

Anna Zimmerman posted a clip of little boy Lincoln hooked up to tubes and having difficulty breathing on his fifth day in a medical facility and revealed the heartbreak of watching him in pain. 

She wrote on her blog it was heartbreaking hearing him say: ‘Mama, this isn’t worth it. Mama, when is this going to stop? Mama, I don’t feel so good. Mama, it is no use. Mama, I’m not gonna go home.’ 

Lincoln has since recovered but Zimmerman warned parents to take COVID-19 seriously. 

Anna Zimmerman posted a clip of little boy Lincoln who had difficulty breathing earlier this month on his fifth day in a Colorado medical facility

He first started sneezing March 21 and by March 30 he was needing more and more support and oxygen and was admitted to the hospital, his mother writes on her blog

‘As a physician, I followed the outbreak of COVID-19 in China and Italy closely. Although no state or federal mandate was in place, we pulled our kids out of Jiujitsu and swimming lessons early, because we believed this virus was dangerous before many people started to take it seriously,’ the mother explained on Mighty Littles. 

‘The kids continued to go to preschool and kindergarten, and their last day at school was March 12th.’

The state of Colorado closed schools from March 16.

Zimmerman said her children never went on a playdate and she wouldn’t even let them go across the street to talk to their neighborhood friends.

‘We adopted the stay-at-home recommendations early and stuck to them. We did everything right’ she writes in the blog.

However on March 21 Lincoln began showing signs of coronavirus.

‘Lincoln sneezed a few times, I thought it was allergies. The following day he got a stuffy nose and slight cough. He didn’t have a fever and I wasn’t super worried, I assumed he picked up a little cold,’ she explained. 

LINCOLN’S CORONAVIRUS DIARY

March 12: Last day of school and Lincoln’s quarantine begins.

March 16: Colorado State closes schools

March 21: Lincoln begins sneezing has a stuffy nose and slight cough. His mother has left the house once to go to Target and his father has left once to go to Costco since March 12.

March 27: Lincoln had a high fever of 104.5

March 28: Lincoln goes to the doctor and is diagnosed with pneumonia after a viral illness. They begin antibiotics and oxygen treatment at home.

March 30: Lincoln needs more support and oxygen and is admitted to hospital.

He needs 2l of oxygen and by that night 4l.

March 31: He needs 6l of oxygen then 9l. He develops seesaw breathing, nasal flaring, grunting, retracting, tachypneic and has to use muscles in his chest, abdomen, and neck to help him breathe

His labs and X-ray don’t look like Coronavirus but that night he tests positive.

April 4: Hospital day 6. He is starting to eat better, IV fluids are turned off and he’s on less than 1L of flow.

‘On March 27th, he got a fever – a high fever to 104.5. He looked miserable and pathetic. I started to worry. We saw the pediatrician first thing in the morning on March 28th, got a diagnosis of pneumonia after a viral illness (totally reasonable) and we did oral antibiotics and oxygen at home for the next 48 hours.’

Zimmerman said Lincoln had moments where he looked ‘totally fine’, and other moments where he looked sick.

By March 30 he was needing more and more support and oxygen and was admitted to the hospital, his mother writes.

But she still wasn’t convinced he had coronavirus as after March 12 only Zimmerman and her husband left the property. He went to Costco once and she went to Target once.

‘I knew walking into the hospital that we would be there for a few days – I thought three, maybe four. I knew that he would be placed on a ‘COVID rule out’ – where they treat him as if he has it until the testing comes back negative,’ the physician wrote online. ‘And, because I am familiar with hospital policies on COVID, I knew that I would not be able to leave his room until his testing was negative.’

From needing 2 liters of oxygen from his first day in medical care to requiring 9 liters by the following night, Zimmerman became increasingly anxious and described watching her son in pain as ‘agony’.

‘He was working so hard to breathe – using all of the muscles in his chest, abdomen, and neck to help him breathe,’ Zimmerman wrote. ‘The medical terms used to describe respiratory distress – seesaw breathing, nasal flaring, grunting, retracting, tachypneic – he had them all.’

Zimmerman said even though his labs and X- Ray didn’t look like coronavirus, the doctor confirmed on his second night in hospital that he had COVID-19.

The mother cried at hearing the news and didn’t understand how the child got ill despite the family being so careful.

‘His timeline didn’t fit. His labs didn’t fit. His X-ray didn’t fit. We took all the precautions,’ she explained.

‘I did everything right. I was supposed to keep my family safe and I failed.’

Zimmerman was also worried the rest of her family could get sick and found it difficult being apart from them while she isolated in the hospital room with Lincoln.

She struggled not being able to have contact with him and watching him refuse to eat due to loss of appetite.

He was on as much as 9 liters of oxygen a day at one point and he would tell her: ‘Mama, this isn’t worth it. Mama, I’m not gonna go home’

Zimmerman wrote: ‘The medical terms used to describe respiratory distress – seesaw breathing, nasal flaring, grunting, retracting, tachypneic – he had them’

‘He will cough up slime, and look totally air hungry. His saturations will drop and his heart rate will spike,’ Zimmerman shared in her blog

‘I can’t even bribe him to eat chocolate pudding or chocolate milk or chocolate ice cream — and this is my kid who asks me first thing in the morning ‘Mama, are you hiding chocolate from me?’ nearly every morning,’ she joked on the blog.

By the time she shared the video of his dry cough, Lincoln had been in hospital five days on April 4 and was beginning to eat small amounts. His oxygen had been brought down to 4 liters but he still had ‘the WORST cough ever’.

‘He will cough up slime, and look totally air hungry. His saturations will drop and his heart rate will spike,’ Zimmerman shared.

She described him as sleeping 16 hours a day with 30-minute bursts of being upbeat. 

She added about her isolation: ‘Did I mention I don’t have a shower???’

Zimmerman said friends and neighbors have dropped off food and body wipes.

As she encouraged others to reach out to those who may be in need, the mother said Lincoln was doing much better by day 6 in hospital. He was off IV fluids and on just 1 liter of oxygen.

‘No one blamed or shamed us for our son testing positive,’ she said about the support. ‘I hope that this sense of community will persist after we move back towards our daily lives after COVID.

‘Please stay safe. Please stay healthy. Please take this virus seriously – it is no joke.’ 

‘Starting to see my little boy again’: Lincoln is pictured on day five in hospital this month

https://youtube.com/watch?v=ojWZCUToeM0%3Frel%3D0%26showinfo%3D1
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Celebrities

Kehlani Addresses Rumors in ‘Everybody Business’ – Watch the Music Video & Read the Lyrics!

Kehlani is back!

The 24-year-old singer debuted a new song called “Everybody Business” on Thursday (April 16).

PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Kehlani

I ain’t ever been a half-assed lover / Rather lay out on the train tracks for ya,” she sings on the track. The track borrows from Pharrell‘s 2003 track “Frontin’” with Jay-Z.

She also released a self-directed video, produced during quarantine, which opens with her Googling herself and rumors about her life.

Watch the music video for “Everybody Business” and read the lyrics inside…

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Video making light of coronavirus on the Ruby Princess is shared

‘Genocide on the seas’: Disturbing ‘satirical’ video making light of coronavirus outbreak on the Ruby Princess is shared by crew members still quarantined on board

  • The video is filmed as a satirical movie trailer and shows the crew in isolation 
  • ‘Death ship films. Based on true events. Every ship has its secrets,’ the video says
  • It calls the March 8 cruise that infected 600 passengers ‘genocide on the seas’
  • More than 600 cases of coronavirus and 16 deaths are linked to the cruise ship
  • The cruise ship is docked at Port Kembla and is under investigation by police 
  • Learn more about how to help people impacted by COVID

Crew members quarantined on the Ruby Princess have created a harrowing ‘satirical’ video making light of the coronavirus outbreak on board.

There are 52 crew on board the cruise ship – which is docked at Port Kembla, south of Sydney – who have tested positive to COVID-19.

Ruby Princess employees have passed the time in isolation by sharing a video amongst themselves calling the vessel a ‘death ship’.

The video goes on to dub the ship a ‘genocide on the seas’, making light of the fact 16 passengers from the ill-fated New Zealand cruise have died of coronavirus. 

Police are investigating how more than 2,600 people were allowed to disembark the ship when it docked in Sydney on March 19 without undergoing adequate health checks, with more than 600 passengers testing positive to coronavirus since.

They video dubbed the ship a ‘genocide on the seas,’ referring to the ill-fated New Zealand cruise on March 8 that infected 600 passengers with coronavirus, and went on to kill 16 people around Australia

 

The movie trailer-style video reportedly shows a crew member wearing a face mask glancing around his cabin with a scared expression

The video is filmed as a sardonic movie trailer, and shows footage filmed on board the Ruby Princess of workers in isolation.

It also shows grainy footage of crowds of passengers on the pool deck, prior to the COVID-19 outbreak on board. 

‘Death ship films. Based on true events,’ the video says.

‘Every ship has its secrets. How do you fight a secret? A secret that spreads. One man discovers how much a secret costs.’ 

The video shows a crew member wearing a face mask glancing around his cabin with a scared expression, according to 7 News.

It then shows footage of a water police boat approaching the ship, and another employee lying in his bed. 

Some 52 crew on board the cruise ship – which is docked at Port Kembla, south of Sydney – who have tested positive to COVID-19 

The Ruby Princess will remain moored at the port near Wollongong for the next six days, with crew from more than 50 countries on board

‘Cabin fever setting in,’ a crew member, not featured in the video, told 7News.

‘What I can’t understand is that all the passengers from the [Norwegian Jewel] were quarantined in Sydney but our passengers were simply herded off, even though an ambulance had been requested the day before,’ the crew member said.

‘Surely NSW Health would have known about the ambulance and also that they were receiving swabs from passengers that were sick.’    

The Ruby Princess will remain moored at the port near Wollongong for the next six days, with crew from more than 50 countries on board. 

A team of 30 detectives from state crime, counter terrorism and marine area command are investigating the communications and actions which led to the docking and disembarking of the vessel.

The investigation will cover the actions of the port authority, ambulance, police, the NSW Health department and Carnival Australia.

‘The only way I can get to the bottom of whether our national biosecurity laws and our state laws were broken is through a criminal investigation,’ NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller said.

The investigation will cover the actions of the port authority, ambulance, police, the NSW Health department and Carnival Australia. 

On April 8, NSW Police raided the vessel, questioning its captain and searching for evidence in a rapid escalation of the criminal investigation.

The first briefing into the investigation was held last Wednesday morning, before officers dressed in gas masks, goggles and white hazmat suits boarded the vessel at Port Kembla, south of Wollongong, at 7pm that day.

Timeline of Ruby Princess fiasco

March 18: The Ruby Princess issues an urgent mayday call for an ambulance for two of its passengers presenting with coronavirus-like symptoms 24 hours before the ship is allowed to dock in Sydney. 

March 19: The Ruby Princess arrives in Sydney Harbour. More than 2,700 guests are allowed to disembark without adequate health checks. 

March 25: Australian Border Force Commissioner Michael Outram says New South Wales Health is responsible for letting coronavirus patients disembark the ship.

March 29: Several crew members are evacuated and taken to hospital after being diagnosed with coronavirus.

April 2: A 66-year-old crew member is taken off the Ruby Princess for medical treatment. More than 200 crew members are sick and in self-isolation.

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian defends the actions of NSW Health and the Australian Border Force and points the finger at the Ruby Princess. She claims staff onboard may have misled NSW Health about the extent of illnesses in passengers.

April 3: Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton alleges Ruby Princess’ operators weren’t transparent about the health of crew: ‘It was ‘clear that some of the companies have been lying about the health of passengers and crew on board’.

April 4: Leaked emails show NSW Health knew of the coronavirus risk on board the Ruby Princess before allowing its thousands of passengers to disembark. 

April 5: A criminal investigation is launched into how passengers were able to disembark without health checks 

April 8: A team of 30 detectives from state crime, counter terrorism and marine area command start investigating the handling of the Ruby Princess coronavirus scandal. The first briefing into the investigation is held.

April 9: NSW Police clad in PPE equipment raid the vessel, questioning its captain and searching for evidence in a rapid escalation of the criminal investigation.

April 11: NSW Health confirms that at least 46 crew members of the Ruby Princess cruise ship have contracted COVID-19

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Celebrities

The Weeknd Debuts Intense Music Video for ‘Until I Bleed Out’ – Watch!

The Weeknd is back with another exciting visual from his studio album, After Hours.

The 30-year-old “Blinding Lights” singer debuted the music video for “Until I Bleed Out” on Tuesday (April 7).

PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of The Weeknd

In the video, The Weeknd is seen wearing a red suit, with blood on his face, eventually falling to the floor at a party filled with women and balloons.

I don’t even want to get high no more, just want it out of my life,” he sings. If you haven’t yet, click here to stream the new album.

Watch the intense music video for “Until I Bleed Out” inside…


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