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Lifestyle

Eddie Hearn working to get boxing back in July but reveals there’s a ‘huge amount’ of barriers – The Sun

BRITISH BOXING will return on a small scale, behind-closed-doors basis in July as long as the Government gives the green light.

The British Boxing Board of Control have blocked all bouts until June and insisted they will need around a month to prepare once the lockdown rules are relaxed or lifted.

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But Matchroom promoter Eddie Hearn hopes to see a change in the protocol as early as next week, that will kickstart the return of the sport.

Hearn said: “Initially everyone wanted to rush back but now we understand the timing has to be right.

“There are so many things to consider, not just the safety of the fighters but that of the NHS too, as we would need to take doctors away from working for the country with ill people suffering from COVID-19.

"We cannot be putting extra strain on the NHS while all of this is going on.

I think we will see a new format, we feel we should start small and get boxing back on TV and learn from any mistakes we make.

“We all want boxing back as soon as possible but it is not that easy. To create a behind-closed-doors and sterile environment, to restart the sport, comes with a huge amount of barriers.

“But that is what we do, hopefully some restrictions are lifted next week and we can start to explore the possibilities.

"I am confident we will see the first events back on these shores in July.”

BBBofC general secretary Robert Smith is in daily dialogue with the nation’s decision makers and already has a firm grasp on the crucial medical demands that must be met to allow a bout to happen.

Any TV studio or purpose-built venue will have to be visited and passed fit by the board and be staffed by at least two doctors and an ambulance and coronavirus testing.

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Smith said: “It is likely to be in TV studios or purpose-build venues and they need to be sorted out now, so we have an idea about where we are going to go.

“We have regular communications with the Government and we have an MP on the board but, until the Government explains their position, we are like every other sport and just don’t know.

“I think we will see a new format, we feel we should start small and get boxing back on TV and learn from any mistakes we make.

“Everybody at an event will be tested and it is the timings of those tests that will be interesting.

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“Do we test them 48 hours before they box, get the results 24 hours before and, if they’re positive, pull them out? And do we have back-up boxers to cover them? There are lots of moving pieces.”

Hearn, whose Matchroom family firm also runs major snooker and darts events, fears there are dark days ahead for a number of sports in the UK.

But he believes boxing still has a bright future that will not be dimmed by fights happening without fans.

He said: “We are lucky that boxing had a huge amount of momentum going into this lockdown, other sports didn’t and might fizzle out of existence.

“Every sport is going to be scrapping for airtime, sponsorships and schedules and we have to make sure we come back firing.

“We will come back with smaller shows to start with but we want to stage major shows behind closed doors because it will be groundbreaking.

“I don’t want to be in a dark studio with four dark walls and no atmosphere. We want to create a unique moment and destination for these events and we see it as the ultimate challenge.”

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World News

Dems allegedly working around Congress to send checks to illegal immigrants

Democratic governors and mayors are going around Congress to put money into the pockets of illegal immigrants who were excluded from receiving the $1,200 coronavirus relief checks that are part of the $2.2 trillion stimulus plan approved last month, according to a report.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom created a private-public $125 million fund that illegal immigrants would be able to draw from and Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot expanded city benefits, including money from the city’s Small Business Resiliency Program, for illegal immigrants.

Minneapolis, run by Democratic Mayor Jacob Frey, is creating a $5 million funding package that would be available to all residents who are eligible, including illegal immigrants.

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy said a fund for immigrants was “something we want to take a look at,” Politico reported on Wednesday.

More than 15 million immigrants will not be on the receiving end of stimulus checks or expanded unemployment benefits because Congress limited eligibility to workers who have Social Security numbers, the report said, citing the Migration Policy Institute.

Many immigrants – illegal and legal – file taxes using an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number because they do not have a Social Security number.

The eligibility requirement was by design.

Coronavirus benefits were “limited to citizens and residents of the U.S. that are legally permitted to work here,” a Republican congressional aide told Politico.

The aide explained that immigrants – including students, spouses and legal immigrants – who file with a taxpayer number can also use it for “many different reasons related to having to pay U.S. tax” but not to work in the US.

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) introduced a bill that would allow “2020 recovery rebates” based on an individual’s taxpayer identification number.

“These taxpayers work in critical sectors of our economy, like agriculture, and contribute greatly to our country,” Correa said.

Excluding them, he said places “some of our most vulnerable residents in grave danger.”

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Lifestyle

Experts reveals the working from home etiquette you should follow

The ultimate guide to lockdown etiquette: Royal experts reveal the polite way to gracefully navigate everything from Houseparty chats to hogging the WiFi

  • Royal experts have revealed the etiquette people should be following to respect their neighbours
  •  Etiquette expert William Hanson warned against downloading large files on shared wifi networks, and avoiding phone calls in communal spaces
  •  Meanwhile Grant Harrold, who was Prince Charles’ royal butler between 2005 and 2011, highlighted the importance of keeping music to a minimum and offering to help out vulnerable neighbours
  • Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should you see a doctor?

Royal experts have revealed the etiquette people should be following to respect their neighbours, as the nation adapts to working from home amid the coronavirus pandemic. 

Etiquette expert William Hanson warned against downloading large files on shared wifi networks, and avoiding phone calls in communal spaces. 

Meanwhile Grant Harrold, who was Prince Charles’ royal butler between 2005 and 2011, and still lives on his Gloucestershire estate in Highgrove, highlighted the importance of keeping music to a minimum and offering to help out vulnerable neighbours.

Royal experts  William Hanson and Grant Harrold revealed their top etiquette tips for working from home – including keeping phone conversations private, keeping the music down and helping out neighbours(stock image)

Speaking to FEMAIL, William said: ‘Just because we may now all be working from the comfort of our own homes, perhaps more relaxed than when at the office, it does not mean to say our standards and courtesy towards others can be relaxed. If anything, it should be heightened.’

‘Domestic wifi is not usually as strong as a corporate connection so be respectful of downloading or uploading big files when there may be others nearby who need the internet for work.’

‘Unless you are the only person around, avoid taking work phone or videos calls in shared living space. This is especially true for video calls where you need to make sure your camera won’t catch an unsuspecting flatmate or your partner walking into the back of shot.’

‘We are all having to quickly adapt to the new normal and innocent transgressions should be met with levity and understanding, allowing all parties to learn as they go.’

Grant Harrold’s top 10 ten etiquette rules for working from home amid the lockdown

1. Keep music to a reasonable volume

We can all get slightly carried away with our music tastes and the volume level, but bear in mind as our neighbours are mostly likely home, they may not be so appreciative of you being the neighbourhood DJ so let’s keep the levels to a minimum.

2. Keep your phone discussions private

Grant Harrold, who was Prince Charles’ royal butler between 2005 and 2011, highlighted the importance of keeping music to a minimum

We can forget when on the phone our voice volumes get slightly louder, especially if you are in the garden. The neighbourhood may not wish to know your spreadsheet updates, therefore, bear in mind that the walls have ears!

3. Avoid arguments with family members

Spending more time around our loved one can become somewhat tricky as fallouts are likely. Again the neighbours will not appreciate listening to what sounds like a scene from Eastenders, so try to keep tempers low and lets all act like UN Peacekeepers.

4. Be mindful of the WiFi

When you have a few members of the household all using the wifi, boxes may not be able to cope and you will find that your devices struggle. Therefore, perhaps have allocated times for usage so everyone has an opportunity to use the wifi at some point in the day.

5. Have family meals

This is a wonderful opportunity to reconnect with the family, so why not all sit down for family meals and let’s do something that has been lost in the mists of time… conversations! let’s be adventurous and have a go at talking to our loved ones during a meal.

Etiquette expert William Hanson warned against downloading large files on shared wifi networks, and avoiding phone calls in communal spaces

6. Keep your distance from others

Social distancing is something we all need to be doing at this moment in time. This is still vital with others outside your household. Do not worry about coming across rude as we are all aware this is a priority to get through and beat this virus.

7. Respect each other’s space

When you are spending time in a confined space with your family you can feel like there is no escape. Try to respect other family members space and realise we all need time to ourselves and we should not be offended if a loved one takes themself out of the family gathering from time to time.

8. Offer to assist neighbours

This is the time to be mindful and able to assist your neighbours while remembering social distancing. You can phone, email, text or write to a neighbour to check if they are ok and if they will require any assistance. Bear in mind if you write to a neighbour they will need to wash their hands after reading the note and perhaps remind them of this in the note.

9. Wash down and clean anything you use

We all touch things in the home without realising from the doors, cupboards, washing machines etc. You may wish to consider washing these items down as you use them to ensure nothing can be passed on to someone else especially if you think you have the virus.

10. Have family time

This is an opportunity to have time with our loved ones and those we care about. In this time of uncertainty, we have seen how we can lose our loved ones without warning and we don’t get a goodbye, therefore let’s realise how precious life is and how lucky we have to have family and show them how much they mean to you.

These rules apply to everyone no matter of your background, religion, race, sex etc, even the Royal family will have to adhere to these rules and guidelines to keep everyone safe including themselves and remember, Stay at home, protect the NHS and save lives!

The ultimate guide to Houseparty etiquette: William Hanson reveals the dos and don’ts of virtual gatherings, from what to wear to NEVER invading someone else’s group chat

NEVER GATECRASH SOMEONE ELSE’S CHAT

I would never join someone else’s conversation on Houseparty without being invited in. This is virtual gatecrashing. 

It’s not acceptable in the real, coronavirus-free world and it’s not acceptable now. There is a highly strong chance that it will be awkward for everyone else. 

If you are the host of a scheduled party, lock the room to prevent the awkwardness.

DON’T WEAR YOUR PYJAMAS 

It’s important to make some sort of effort in these weird times. 

No need to put on a dinner jacket or ball gown, but brush your hair, shave, and look moderately presentable before making yourself virtually visible. 

It’s only acceptable to wear nightwear if the call is in the early hours of the morning or after 9pm at night.

NEVER GATECRASH SOMEONE ELSE’S CHAT

I would never join someone else’s conversation on Houseparty without being invited in. This is virtual gatecrashing. 

It’s not acceptable in the real, coronavirus-free world and it’s not acceptable now. There is a highly strong chance that it will be awkward for everyone else. 

If you are the host of a scheduled party, lock the room to prevent the awkwardness.

DON’T WEAR YOUR PYJAMAS 

It’s important to make some sort of effort in these weird times. 

No need to put on a dinner jacket or ball gown, but brush your hair, shave, and look moderately presentable before making yourself virtually visible. 

It’s only acceptable to wear nightwear if the call is in the early hours of the morning or after 9pm at night.

DON’T TEXT OTHER PEOPLE 

No one is busy at the moment. There should be no excuse not to give your whole attention to one thing at one time. 

Aside from being rude, doing two activities at once is only going to mean you have more time to fill later on. 

Also turn off your television during the chat. As good as the technology is, it can be very distracting and can impair other participants from hearing you. 

If you want to keep the news on, for example, switch it to mute.

AVOID CHEWING ON CAMERA 

Watching someone eat is never pretty, which is one of the reasons why at dinners guests are encouraged to talk sideways, so you don’t see someone masticating head-on. 

Virtual dinner parties are another matter, and there is no way to not eat on camera, but don’t have the camera too close if so. 

You can move closer to it during after-dinner coffee, once all chewing is over.

If you are enjoying munchettes while meeting for drinks, try to keep your mouth closed and take small bites. 

If you’ve bitten off more than you can chew, use a hand to cover your mouth until you’ve swallowed. 

NOMINATE A HOST 

A designated host – perhaps the person who instigated the call – is a good idea as they will act as the conductor to the symphony that is your houseparty call. 

Having someone nominated as a host for virtual dinners is particularly important. 

They can decide when everyone is finished and ready for the next course, and can help fuel the conversation.

DON’T LEAVE WITHOUT SAYING GOODBYE 

For a virtual dinner you must stay until everyone has finished eating, at least – unless you start feeling unwell or have a domestic incident. 

For group chats it is cowardly to disappear without saying goodbye. 

Again, you wouldn’t just walk away from a conversation at a real party, so the same rule applies in the digital world.

If you need to go to the bathroom, there’s no need to announce where you are going – most of us can guess. 

A simple ‘please excuse me’ will do. If you can’t turn off your camera and mic, while remaining in the chat, then set the phone on a surface, camera facing down, and make sure you shut the door when going about your business so no noise is picked up by the mic.

For virtual dinners, only freshen up in between courses – ideally only after the main course, before the pudding, as with normal dinners.

KEEP IT TO FIVE OR SIX PEOPLE 

For group chats five or six is a nice number, or else it gets competitive and can be a headache rather than a laugh. 

For dinners, six or eight people is optimal. But that is six to eight people in total, not six to eight devices connected – with one device having two people on the connection.

 

 

 

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Categories
Lifestyle

'Working More' Isn’t Really A Great Solution If You’re Feeling Lonely

Whether you’re feeling down about the number of comments on your latest Instagram post, or just have that sense that no one else really gets you, you’ve experienced it. Feeling lonely is, perhaps ironically, universal.

But, what is loneliness, exactly? Simply put, “it’s the discrepancy between what you have and what you want from your relationships,” says Stephanie Cacioppo, PhD, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience at the University of Chicago, who specializes in the study of loneliness and social cognition.

It’s not necessarily about being physically surrounded by people—because you might feel especially lonely in a crowd—but about your mentality. When you feel lonely, it’s usually because you aren’t quite satisfied with what you have, whether it’s in that moment or throughout your life, Cacioppo explains. And until you’re able to pinpoint and then address what you’re dissatisfied with, you’ll feel isolated, left out, and in need of companionship.

The upside: Feeling lonely isn’t necessarily a bad thing, Cacioppo notes. It’s a reminder that something’s off about your social environment and that you need to prioritize your happiness.

Chances are, though, you’re not too grateful for loneliness while you’re experiencing it. In fact, the feeling makes you more likely to interpret reality negatively, which can bring on a ton of self-loathing and self-criticism, she says. The key to turning your mood around? Adjusting your social lens to one that’s more positive.

Easier said than done, right? Thought you might say that. But here are 17 things you can actually do to feel a little less lonely, a little more confident, and way more connected.

1. Admit you’re lonely.

As with a lot of things, the first step to moving forward is getting real about what you’re going through. Most people try to deny they’re lonely, or they assume they must just be anxious or depressed. Why? “Because there’s a lot of stigma surrounding loneliness,” says Ami Rokach, PhD, clinical psychologist, course director at York University, and author of Loneliness, Love And All That’s Between.

Many people are ashamed to admit they feel lonely because they associate the experience with social isolation and otherness, he adds. But refusing to come to terms with your loneliness means putting off your chance to do something about it.

2. Remind yourself it’s not just you.

“We’re not alone in our loneliness,” Rokach explains.

Now, this doesn’t mean you should necessarily lean into the loneliness simply because others are dealing with it, too, Rokach warns. It’s a great opportunity to remember that, just like anyone else, you have the power to get yourself out of this situation.

Working from home more often these days? Here’s how to feel less lonely while you’re at it:

3. Be realistic.

Though there are things you can do to help yourself feel less lonely, they’re not all foolproof. “Sometimes you won’t succeed,” says Rokach. People won’t want to make connections with you, they’ll be too busy, or you’ll still end up feeling lonely—it happens.

Those moments will be tough, he explains, but the key is to persevere anyway. You won’t want to at the time, but if you set out to tackle your loneliness knowing it’s a win-some-lose-some game, you won’t be so quick to give up.

4. Don’t deny or distance.

Because of all the shameful and self-critical feelings that accompany loneliness, a common reaction is to kid yourself into thinking you don’t actually need anyone, things are better this way, and you’ll do just fine on your own, Rokach explains. You might actually believe that for a while, too.

Down the line, however, this response will be harmful—to your mental and physical health. People need people, and everyone needs to feel loved. So, as soon as you can put a label to your loneliness, it’s time to try and do something about it.

5. Write down positive memories.

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This is one of those pieces of advice you’ve surely been given before, but never actually committed to. Now’s the time to give it a real shot. Just dedicating 15 minutes per day to jotting down special moments you’ve shared with friends and family can be enough to overcome negative feelings, Cacioppo explains. (Don’t have 15 minutes? You can still cherish your most special memories with a One Line A Day journal.) The process will remind you you’re not alone, and the memories are bound to improve your mood.

6. Smile.

Smiling at yourself in the mirror is an unusual ask—Cacioppo gets it. So, she recommends closing your eyes and thinking of the last time you made someone smile or laugh and let your body do the rest. Will it feel strange? Yes. But, will it help? Also yes.

Just thinking of a time when you were feeling giddy will automatically bring a smile to your face—a move that will set off all those feel-good neurotransmitters in your brain and trick you into feeling happier than you were just a few secs before. Once you’re feeling a little better, hold onto that feeling by leaning into something that makes you feel really good, such as cracking open your favorite book or going for a run.

7. Take note of all the things you’re grateful for.

When you’re lonely, you’ll bury yourself in your thoughts—usually bummer ones—but, as they say, “gratitude turns what we have into enough.” To get yourself out of that headspace, write down a few things you’re grateful for (think: your job, a roof over your head, and a supportive family). Doing this will shift your thoughts from ones about you and your slump, to those about other people you care about and positive factors in your life.

8. Volunteer.

“Loneliness isn’t dangerous by itself, it’s what we do with it and how we recover that can be dangerous for our physical and mental health,” says Cacioppo. To make sure you’re letting loneliness drive you toward the right thing, consider signing up to volunteer.

Dedicating a day to working with the elderly or making meals at a soup kitchen will fulfill your desire to feel needed and draw you away from the self-centered mindset that loneliness brings on. Plus, the time you spend getting to know the people you’re serving will bring out some of the intimacy and connection you’ve been craving.

9. Get a pet, or spend time with someone else’s.

This one’s great for a ton of reasons. But when it comes to loneliness, interacting with animals has the power to release dopamine in the brain, which is a biggie since the chemical is associated with pleasure and rewards. More than that, walking your dog or taking your cat to the vet for a checkup is an opportunity to start up conversations with other pet owners and maybe even make a new friend, says Cacioppo.

10. Join a club or take a class.

It might make you uncomfortable at first, but it might also be totally worth it. Sign up for a pottery class or a club for fellow true crime documentary lovers, for example. Oh, the club you want doesn’t exist? Start one. Interacting with people with whom you share a common interest makes for a better chance at forming meaningful connections, Cacioppo says, which is usually what lonely people are missing from life.

11. Make a schedule for yourself and stick to it.

Yeah, you probably already have waking up, working, eating, and exercising down pat, but maybe your life’s in need of a little more structure, suggests Cacioppo. Feelings of loneliness often feel like they’ll last forever and there’s nothing you can do to escape the dark cloud hanging over your head, but that’s not true. It can be hard to remind yourself that loneliness is usually temporary, so Cacioppo recommends a strict schedule.

Hot tip: Sneak in planning out next week’s schedule before you call it quits on Friday.

It’s harder to feel alone when you “have a plan and a purpose,” she explains. So, set alarms for an early-morning meditation, a phone call with your sister, and an evening face mask. Pre-planning them will instill you with a sense of control, too. Once you’ve come up with a schedule, stick to it as much as you can. It’ll be tough sometimes, but as long as you take it one day at a time, the structured routine will feel more and more natural, she adds.

12. Go for a walk.

It gets your body moving, gives you a chance to clear your mind, and even offers opportunities to run into a neighbor for a quick chat—all reasons why Rokach is a big fan. Even if you don’t interact with anyone, studies show walks have significant effects on mood. Just a few minutes outside can stop your mood from worsening and can help combat feelings of dread that loneliness brings on.

13. Pick up the phone.

Call someone you love and who cares about you. Rather than exchanging the same old how are yous and fines, actively listen to and really engage with the person on the other line. When they mention something about their lives, ask them for the backstory and let them talk. (Need some inspo? These 200 questions can help spark a meaningful conversation.)

“People are thirsty for this kind of interaction,” Rokach says. Everyone wants to be heard, so give someone in your life the gift of really listening to them, and let their stories take you out of your lonely headspace for a while.

14. Talk to a mental health professional.

A psychologist won’t be able to bring you out of your loneliness—only you can do that—but “they can help you come to terms with the situation,” explains Rokach. They’ll remind you of how much power you have to move forward from this by helping you pinpoint what in your life might be off-kilter and contributing to your loneliness. Once you isolate the cause, a therapist will help you come up with a game plan to address it.

15. Take a social risk.

If you’re feeling lonely because you don’t believe any of your relationships are substantive, now’s your chance to do something about it. Yeah, you might get rejected, but eventually you’ll find a someone or even a whole tribe who ~gets~ you.

Start off somewhere you feel comfortable. Take your workout class, for example: Approach the person who high fives you after each segment or notices when you miss a class. Strike up a conversation as best you can, and you may just hit it off. (Yes, new friends!) Stuck at home? Try reaching out to an old friend via Instagram DM to see what’s new with them.

16. Turn your loneliness into solitude.

While they might sound the same, solitude is different because it’s a choice, explains Rokach. You could let your loneliness consume you (let’s face it, sometimes you can’t help it), or you can turn your loneliness into solitude—time spent alone doing something that’s meaningful to you.

Maybe you express how you’re feeling by painting, writing a short story, doing a puzzle, learning a dance routine, or recording a cover of that song you can’t get out of your head. Since loneliness can stick around for a while, it helps to have an outlet.

Btw, at-home workouts are a totally WH-approved outlet for solitude, too.

17. Don’t busy yourself.

“Many people try to run away from loneliness,” says Rokach. “They’ll busy themselves with needless things like second jobs or extra hours at work when they don’t need the money as a way to stifle loneliness.” That’s not the right move. It might help you forget you’re lonely for a bit, but you’ll only end up feeling worse in the end.

The key is to slow down for a bit and focus on something you really love or something you’ve always wanted to do but never did because sticking to the mundane won’t help much.

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Lifestyle

Employees working from home don fancy dress outfits to boost morale

Beats working in your PJs! Employees don VERY creative fancy dress outfits to boost morale during lockdown – from zoo animals to a full Power Ranger suit

  • Workers from around the world took to social media to share snaps of outfits
  • Included a head-to-toe Power Ranger suit and a homemade daffodil costume
  • Many donned animal onesies while some glammed up in masquerade masks
  • Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should you see a doctor?

Employees who are working from home have taken to wearing fancy dress in their makeshift offices to boost morale amid the coronavirus crisis. 

Dozens took to social media to share photos of their impressive outfits, which include a head-to-toe Power Ranger suit, animal onesies and a daffodil headpiece made out of Selfridges bags. 

The hilarious snaps from around the globe show workers going the extra mile to inject some fun into their monotonous days spent in lockdown.

One social media user was pictured wearing a lion mane’s wig and dramatic face paint for Fancy Dress Friday.

Instagram user Blawreate created a homemade daffodil to perfectly frame his face – with petals made from Selfridges bags

 A team member from UCL Archaeology in the South East shared this snap of one of its employees donning a full Power Rangers suit

Brid Enright, of London, shared this snap of her team enjoying a group chat, during which they celebrated one of their birthdays


Game, set, match! Fran Hales shared this photo of him ‘serving up some top spin’ during isolation (right) while Alex Anthony, from St Neots, also urged people to put on fancy dress and ‘get moving’ (left)

Instagram user Goody Scott shared this snap of her working from home dressed as a pirate

They captioned their snap on Instagram: ‘Day 7? In the Big Brother house and the housemates have gone feral.’

Fran Hales, from Bristol, stood poised in a 1980s tennis player outfit as though he was ready to make a serve.

He quipped: ‘Serving up some top spin isolation Fancy Dress Friday. Keeping healthy, entertained and most important of all, doing so in fancy dress!

‘I want to encourage the inner fancy dresser in you all, to dig out costumes (or make them) and share it with the world.’

One Zoom conference call showed a group struggling to contain their amusement as they wore hippy, Batman, viking and papier mache lobster outfits

Instagrammer Diddy Gilman shared this photo of himself dressed as ‘Sister Gilman’ during a weekly Skype meeting


This Instagrammer went all out with their lion costume (left) while Jamie Fry, from Newham, London, sported a zebra onesie fitted with a hood and used the Instagram post as an opportunity to update his followers on day 12 of lockdown (right)

Meanwhile, another – called Blawreate – created a homemade daffodil to perfectly frame his face – with petals made from Selfridges bags.

He grinned from inside his headdress while clutching two daffodils in his hands – as he announced: ‘I’m a daffodil baby’.

One Zoom conference call showed a group struggling to contain their amusement as they wore hippy, Batman, viking and papier mache lobster outfits.

Another social media user admitted the fancy dress day is a ‘weekly excuse to have a giggle’ amid the coronavirus outbreak – and donned a Frida Kahlo look.

Instagrammer Caity Daws, from Canberra, stepped up the glamour for her teleconference call

Another social media user admitted the fancy dress day is a ‘weekly excuse to have a giggle’ amid the coronavirus outbreak – and donned a Frida Kahlo look

A Twitter user called George showed off his Scottish attire – teaming a tartan sash with a matching kilt and beret.

Jamie Fry, from Newham, London, sported a zebra onesie fitted with a hood and used the Instagram post as an opportunity to update his followers on day 12 of lockdown. 

Meanwhile another Instagram user cut a more sleek and sultry figure – wearing a masquerade mask and satin dress.

Samantha Wragg admitted she was ‘very limited’ for fancy dress and donned a JustEat sponsored football outfit to go as Welsh footballer Robbie Savage. 

One Instagram user cut a more sleek and sultry figure – wearing a masquerade mask and satin dress

Nina Edwards shared a screengrab of her catch-up with colleagues, where the fancy dress theme was pretty loose


An Instagram user shared this photo of her ‘sweating for our superheroes’, explaining she’d been working out in her costume for the NHS (left) while Fran Hales, from Bristol, ditched his tennis attire and opted for a spooky suit to brighten up his solitude (right)

Netstar shared this snap from their team meeting on Friday, with a thank you to the NHS


Samantha Wragg admitted she was ‘very limited’ for fancy dress and donned a JustEat sponsored football outfit to go as Welsh footballer Robbie Savage (left) while Twitter user George showed off his Scottish attire (right)

Andrew Cuff shared this snap of his after work virtual drinks with colleagues – who all donned a variety of fancy dress

Instagram user patchworkeimer shared this photo of herself dressed as a virtual princess for children who couldn’t go to their nursery’s party

The trend follows Prime Minister Boris Johnson announcing a total lockdown last Monday – permitting only ‘essential’ travel to the supermarkets, one form of exercise and social gatherings of no more than two people, last week.

In a letter to 30 million households, Mr Johnson is to tell Brits ‘we have sought to put in the right measures at the time’.

He has admitted ‘things will get worse before they get better’ and ‘will not hesitate to go further if that is what the scientific and medical advice tells us we must do’. 

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Doctor working with Amazon tribe tests positive for coronavirus

Doctor working with Amazon tribe tests positive for coronavirus – sparking fears deadly bug will reach remote indigenous communities

  • The doctor works with the Tikunas – a tribe of 30,000 living in the upper Amazon
  • He had returned from vacation and then developed a fever before being tested
  • Eight tribe members he treated on his first day back at work are being monitored 
  • Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should you see a doctor?

A doctor working with the largest tribe in the Amazon has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Brazil’s Health Ministry announced the news yesterday – ringing alarm bells that the epidemic could spread to vulnerable and remote indigenous communities with devastating effect.

The doctor, who has not been named, had returned from vacation on March 18 to work with the Tikunas, a tribe of more than 30,000 people who live in the upper Amazon near the borders with Colombia and Peru.

He developed a fever later that day and went into isolation, testing positive for the respiratory disease COVID-19 a week later, the ministry said.

The doctor, who has not been named, had returned from vacation on March 18 to work with the Tikunas (pictured), a tribe of more than 30,000 people who live in the upper Amazon near the borders with Colombia and Peru

Eight tribe members he treated on his first day back working for the indigenous health service Sesai have also been isolated in their homes and are being monitored, the ministry said.

The doctor’s infection is the first confirmed case of the virus directly present in an indigenous village. It raises fears of an outbreak that could be lethal for Brazil’s 850,000 indigenous people that have a history of decimation by diseases brought by Europeans, from smallpox and malaria to the flu.

Health experts say their way of life in communal hamlets under large thatched structures increases the risk of contagion if any single member contracts the new coronavirus. Social isolation is hard for tribes to practise.

The doctor’s infection is the first confirmed case of the virus directly present in an indigenous village. Pictured: a woman from the Tikuna tribe 

The ministry said the doctor had no symptoms when he returned to work using a protective mask and gloves, but quarantined himself as soon as he developed a fever.

News website G1’s columnist Matheus Leitão reported that the doctor is Brazilian and may have caught the virus while vacationing in southern Brazil or on the boat ride up the Amazon to his work place at Santo Antônio do Içá.

So far, Sesai has reported four suspected cases of the coronavirus in indigenous communities, with only one in the Amazon.

It raises fears of an outbreak that could be lethal for Brazil’s 850,000 indigenous people that have a history of decimation by diseases brought by Europeans, from smallpox and malaria to the flu. Pictured: members of the Tikuna tribe in Brazil

But doctors fear the virus could spread fast among tribes whose immune systems often are already weakened by malnutrition, hepatitis B, tuberculosis and diabetes.

About a third of indigenous deaths in Brazil are caused by existing respiratory diseases.

The H1N1 epidemic in 2016 killed hundreds of indigenous people, mainly of the Guaraní tribe in the colder south of Brazil, where about half of them caught the bug.

So far Brazil has recorded 3,477 cases of coronavirus and 93 deaths from the disease. 

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Brits working from home in coronavirus lockdown share hilarious snaps of their cats and dogs trying to distract them – The Sun

MILLIONS of Brits working from home to combat the spread of coronavirus have shared hilarious snaps of their pets trying to distract them.

Pets across the country appear to be thrilled that their owners will be spending lots more time in the house.

⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news and updates




And, as these sweet snaps show, animals will do anything to try to distract their hard-working owners.

From the big dog who believes he's the size of a tiny puppy, to the hedgehog perfectly-sized for a desk drawer, animal lovers have been sharing some hilarious photos of their attempts to work from home.

One social media user even tweeted a photograph of her pet GOAT curiously inspecting her laptop.

CITIES FALL SILENT

Railways and major roads have fallen silent across the country after Boris Johnson warned office staff to work from home where possible.

It comes following fears Britain could be locked down over the coronavirus, just like in France, Italy and Spain.





Those who live and work in London are particularly vulnerable as the city is the worst-hit place in the UK with 480 cases, the prime minister said.

Nationally, the death toll leapt from 36 to 55 today.

Schools have been told to send kids with a cough home to stop the spread.

It was also reported that up to eight million people could be hospitalised during an outbreak lasting up to a year.

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Working Families Party relocates to building owned by Jared Kushner’s family

New York’s Working Families Party is working for families alright — Donald Trump’s.

The progressive third party and perennial thorn-in-the-side of establishment NY Democrats recently relocated to new offices in a building owned by the family of the president’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner.

The digs at 81 Prospect St. in the Brooklyn’s DUMBO district are part of a suite of four buildings sprawling over 750,000 square feet. Kushner Companies purchased the properties — which they call DUMBO Heights — in 2013.

The Working Families Party had previously been based in 1 MetroTech Center. The relocation to DUMBO happened sometime during the winter of 2019.

The move is a curious choice for the party, which has billed itself as a champion for working people and an implacable foe of the Trump White House. They have called out their new landlord by name on Twitter.

“The richest people on Earth — and the political insiders who serve them — have rigged the rules of our political system to grab up wealth and power for themselves,” the group says on their website, saying the WFP “fights for workers over bosses and people over the powerful.”

Longtime Democratic strategist Jon Reinish laughingly observed, “Irony is clearly alive, well and thriving in brownstone Brooklyn. I think it shows that the Working Families Party is literally all talk if they are padding Jared Kushner’s pocket.”

The Working Families Party and New York chapter director Sochie Nnaemeka did not immediately respond to request for comment.

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