EU risks angering Donald Trump with plan to BAN American travellers

EU risks angering Donald Trump with plan to BAN American travellers when it reopens on July 1 but welcome those from countries with lower infections rates – including China

  • The United States, Russia, and several other countries are considered too risky
  • The list of safe countries was put together by senior diplomats in Brussels
  • The decision has been made despite the fact that the US is an important source of tourism for the European Union 

The EU is planning to ban American travellers when it reopens on July 1, but those from countries with lower infection rates – like China – are set to be welcomed.

The decision – which still needs to be formalised in member states’ capitals – risks angering Donald Trump who has been widely criticised for his handling of the crisis.

The United States, Russia, and several other countries are considered too risky because they have not controlled the coronavirus outbreak, EU officials said Friday.

The list of safe countries was put together by senior diplomats in Brussels following discussions on how to reopen the bloc to business and tourism following lockdown.   

The EU is planning to ban American travellers when it reopens on July 1 but those from countries with lower infection rates – like China – are set to be welcomed. The decision is likely to anger Trump (pictured) 

One of the ‘safe countries’ will be China – but only if it allows European Union travellers to visit as well, the officials said.

EU officials disclosed earlier this week that the US – which has reported more coronavirus deaths and infections than any other country – was highly unlikely to make the final list.

The decision has been made despite the fact that the US is an important source of tourism for the European Union. 

On the safe list are countries like Canada and Australia. The countries were judged on criteria including infection rates and the credibility of public health authorities reporting data.     

The list will be updated every two weeks, which mean countries excluded at the start may be added to the safe list.   

The officials who revealed the contents of the final list spoke to the New York Times on condition of anonymity ahead of its official release next week.

EU officials tried to base the data on science in order to depoliticise the process.  

However that has been made difficult and officials said the United States and other nations had been lobbying intensely to get on the safe list.

The US banned most EU travellers in March and has not eased restrictions since, even when European infections and deaths have fallen.

Mike Pompeo on Thursday said that many European countries were eager to admit American visitors. 

‘We’ll work closely with our European friends, broadly, because I know there’s different views,’ he said.

‘We’ve heard from a dozen or more countries that have very different views about their willingness to open up their borders to anyone, not only folks from the United States of America.’

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